Don't call it a comeback

How I learned to quiet self-doubt and build consistency. I want to tell you a story about myself, and through the process, describe how I've come to use consistency to avoid disappointment, kill doubt, fight depression, and reduce burnout. July 2013: Eight months after suffering a minor stress fracture in my foot brought on by experimentation with "toe shoes" and more likely low calcium intake and way too much Gangnam Style, my running was hitting stride again. Again. I've come to despise that word. My running story goes way back. Some of my earliest and fondest memories are of running, racin…

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The Chrome Distortion: how Chrome negatively alters our expectations.

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Chrome has taught us to idealize features for so long that we've become blind to its many glaring faults. No browser is perfect, this is an unfortunate situation we must live with. But ranking my experience developing responsive hybrid applications, Safari gets an A- and Mobile Safari a B+, while Mobile Chrome get's a D on a good day. Overall my rankings currently look something like this: Safari: A- Edge: A- (tentative, I haven't worked with it often enough yet to honestly rank it) Mobile Safari: B+ Firefox: B+ IE11: B+ Opera: B IE10: B Chrome: B- (on a good day when I'm happy with how nice…

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A Tale of Two States

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Modern Responsive Design (illustrated with Ember and Flexi) This is a cross post of blog post I wrote and published for IsleOfCode on March 11, 2016 here Author's Preamble I was very tempted to name this post "the state of CSS is Awesome", except that the state of CSS is not awesome. This post is very "tale of two cities in nature". When it comes to layouts and CSS, it is both the best of times and the worst of times. The state of CSS IS awesome, but it IS also broken. CSSNext, PostCSS, ember-component-css, and better CSS practices should give us a lot of optimism for the future. And Fl…

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WebWorker Performance Benchmarks

This is a cross post of blog post I wrote and published for IsleOfCode on March 10, 2016 here When Nolan Lawson published his article on High Performance WebWorker Messages, I was immediately stuck with how disparate his conclusions and data were from my own experience. However, I've mostly used WebWorkers in a mobile context (Cordova applications), which by and large means my experience has been with Safari. Could it really be true that Chrome and Firefox were so bad that no method of transfer is better than JSON.stringify? This is something I needed to know, because I'm working on Skyroc…

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Ember.js "Magic" Crash Course

This is a cross post of blog post I wrote and published for IsleOfCode on February 11, 2016 here. I typed up this explanation of some of the magic in ember/ember-cli on the Ember Slack this morning, and felt it would probably be useful to leave it somewhere more permanent. Sometimes Ember feels more magical than it really is, and the transitions and the resolver are probably the most magical piece of Ember for those that don't know about them. This is a TL;DR crash course of this process in Ember, it's not very in depth, and it skims past a few things (such as cached resolutions, cached ins…

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